Geranium Magnificum

Geranium Magnificum

Bees are in trouble. Although Europe has announced a ban on neonicotinoid pesticides, bee numbers have crashed in recent years, and our fuzzy little friends need all the help they can get. If everyone were to grow a pot full of a flower that bees love, it would help enormously.

But what flowers do bees like? The answer tends to be, simple ones with lots of nectar and pollen (of course!). Frilly, complicated flowers like roses that bees have to fight to get into are not on their dinner list. One that is, is the flower above – geranium magnificum, which lives up to its name in June with a magnificent display – masses of purple flowers that will be filled all month with browsing bees.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Foxglove

Another flower that bees love is the humble foxglove. Depending on where you live in the country, this will either be a plant you need to buy from a nursery (it can be grown from seed, though the seed is incredibly fine) or it will be a weed in your garden that you find yourself pulling from every pot. Don’t pull it all out though! Those bell-shaped flowers are irresistible to bees. Just make sure that you keep them well away from children – their berries are poisonous, and their hairy leaves can also cause irritation.

P6140707 Lavender

The beautiful scent of lavender is something that attracts people to the plant almost as readily as bees. The yellow plant in the foreground, on the other hand, is goldenrod and although its flowers are very simple they appear not to appeal to bees in the slightest. But a lovely mound of sweet-smelling lavender will be smothered in bees through August and into September – well worth the space needed to grow this large shrub.

Buddleia_davidii

The buddleia is another plant that needs little introduction – a familiar site everywhere, this hardy little bush can be found growing alongside railways, clinging to cracks in high brick walls – anywhere, indeed, where it can get a foothold. And where the buddleia goes, insects follow. Long, fat spires of tiny purple flowers adorn the bush throughout August and provide both butterflies and bees with an excellent feast. Indeed, it’s hard to take a photograph of a buddleia flower without a feeding bee or butterfly upon it!

Snapdragon

The snapdragon – antirrhinum – is another cheerful and common garden plant, a biennial that flowers profusely throughout the summer. It’s a favourite with children because of its amusing composition – the plant’s stamens are hidden inside the closed ‘mouth’ of the flower, which bees (as you can see) love pushing their way into. A border favourite and very easy to grow, this is a great summer bee feeding station.

oregano

Oregano is best known as a herb, often used in Mediterranean cookery, but it is also another bee favourite. Simple sprays of lilac to deep purple flowers are found throughout August, a month when bees are quite spoiled for choice! Simple to grow, oregano can be kept in a pot on the windowsill if you are short of space, and will be quite at home on a sunny patio.

Sweet pea

The sweet pea is the florist’s favourite, a sentiment that bees would undoubtedly agree with. These gorgeous, beautifully-scented flowers unfold their delicate wings as early as May. A frame of some sort is needed for this popular garden climber – something as simple as a wig-wam of canes in a large pot will suffice, or they can be intermingled with runner beans for an interesting effect. Sweet peas will carry on flowering throughout the summer, providing they are dead-headed regularly. Picking a bunch to allow their sweet scent to fill your living room will encourage even more flowers!

***Apple

It’s easy to forget that one of the bee’s main jobs, from a human point of view, is the pollination of fruit. Therefore an apple or pear tree is also a wonderful bee attractant during the early days of a warm spring when bees are just beginning to venture out and are in most need of nourishment. A tree is not an option if you live in a flat, of course, but even a small garden can usually find room for an apple tree grown on dwarfing rootstock – this type of tree is far less vigorous than a ‘normal’ apple tree and needs no more than a few feet of space to thrive. A good prune every year, once winter has set in, will ensure it stays in shape – and of course, you get the extra reward in autumn of the juicy apples!

Red clover

Red clover is another early bee favourite and can often be found in the slightly wilder parts of a garden – having everything completely neat is not always good for insects! A small rough patch, where the grass is not regularly mowed and where a small patch of nettles and red clover can flourish, can be really helpful to both butterflies and bees. It’s also possible to buy red clover seed, as it is used by vegetable gardeners as a green mulch. The pom-pom flowers are also very attractive, nestled into a bed of grass.

Honeysuckle

Last, but not least, is the honeysuckle. Possessed of the most glorious scent in the cool of an early summer morning or evening, honeysuckle is a rambling shrub that will climb up and mask even the ugliest of walls. Honeysuckles come in a wide variety of colours, ranging from dramatic reds and oranges to pale cream.

In among this ‘top ten’ is a plant for (almost) everyone – why not find a space in your plot for one or two. Or even all ten! The bees will thank you for it, and you will be rewarded with a scent and colour-filled summer.

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